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Professor Martin L. Pall, Washington State University, reports that Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), fibromyalgia (FMS), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the Gulf War syndrome (that reports to experience all four syndromes), share a common cause—all are the result of short term stressors.

All of the stressors that bring on each of the syndromes share one thing in common. They increase the levels of nitric oxide in the body and in turn result in increased levels of peroxynitrite. It is peroxynitrite that causes a cycle that is responsible for a chronic illness that frequently last a lifetime.

Pall suggests the best approach to treat these chronic illnesses is to reduce the peroxynitrite cycle. Although there is not a magic bullet to break the peroxynitrite cycle there are some basic guidelines to follow:

  1. Avoid foods that cause allergic reactions.
  2. Avoid foods containing: mono-sodium glutamate, aspartame, and possibly hydrolyzed vegetable proteins.
  3. Consider using a combination of nutritional supplements that help reduce the peroxynitrite cycle.

Visit Dr. Pall’s web site for detailed information on possible nutritional supplement regimens.

{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Teresa June 16, 2007, 7:12 am

    I disagree with this completely. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in February of 2005 but start having symptoms in late 2003. I was not under abnormal levels of stress at all and really felt like I was on top of the world: my new job was going well, moved in with a wonderful boyfriend (now my husband), had lots of great friends, etc. The most stressful years of my life were when I was in high school and middle school, so if it’s stress-related, wouldn’t that have been the time when my fibromyalgia should have reared its ugly head?

    According to the clinic that treats me for fibromyalgia, changes in hormones can also bring fibromyalgia on (people are more than likely genetically predisposed to it). Since I was in my late 20s when fibromyalgia hit, I really believe it was a change in hormones that caused it.

  • James February 20, 2008, 8:51 am

    “I disagree with this completely. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in February of 2005 but start having symptoms in late 2003. I was not under abnormal levels of stress at all . . .”

    The article doesn’t say “stress”, it says STRESSORS. There’s a very big difference.

  • Jennifer March 13, 2008, 11:19 am

    Yah,… VERY big difference between “stress”, and Stressors. Isn’t it true though so far as Stress is concerned that Happy situations, events cause stress too? – I mean, just because something is a joyful thing doesn’t mean that it can’t have an affect on you. I couldnt understand why I started having flashbacks 7 years after something traumatic happened, and I did have happy things going on, but change of any sort can disrupt, I don’t know, somethin! I’m not “smart” by any means, LOL…. its just that it Is two different things. A Stressor I think, clicks with something in your brain to cause you to react, like if you had a traumatic event happen, a smell or anything that takes you back to that place to make you feel like its happening all over, is a Stressor,… right? Of course that is with PTSD, a mental thing, but physical pain would surely have stressors. BUT I have rambled enough.

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