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It is difficult to discuss Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) without chronic pain entering the discussion. There are a lot of theories about what causes the pain and just as many theories that purport to offer a treatment to alleviate it.

Yale researchers believe that they may know what causes fibromyalgia patients to experience chronic pain. They base their theory that someone who physically exerts themselves describes their muscle pain the same way someone with fibromyalgia describes their pain. Advancing to the next logical step the researchers conclude that the pain felt by fibromyalgia patients is the result of vasomotor dysregulation and vasoconstriction in the muscles. Basically, it means that the muscles constrict, which in turn restricts the blood flow to muscles causing pain from the lack of nourishment to the muscle.

While some current preliminary data is consistent with the researcher’s hypothesis, they have been unable to locate any research material that would contradict their beliefs. Researchers feel that, with current technology, further testing is needed to confirm their suspicions.

{ 6 comments… add one }
  • sharon levin August 6, 2007, 7:17 am

    AS HEAD OF FM AND MYOFASCIAL PAIN IN SOUTHERN AFRICA AM TOTALLY SHOCKED AT THE ABOVE STATEMENT – MYOFASCIAL RESEARCH BY TRAVELL AND SIMONS GOES BACK TO THE 1950’S AND HAS NEVER BEEN NEGATED IN FIBROMYALGIA 9READ PHD DEVIN STARLYNYL 1ST AND 2ND EDITIONS FM AND CHRONIC MYOFASCIAL PAIN 2000 AND 2002 – SHE IS HEAD OF THIS RESEARCH IS USA.

  • sharon levin August 6, 2007, 7:22 am

    MY OWN QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE HEAD OF RESEARCH ACCREDITED BY THE USA COLLEGE OF RHEUMATOLOGY, AM IN PRIVATE PRACTICE, CONSULTING WITH FM/CFIDS/CFS/ADRENAL FATIGUE/NEUROTRANMITTERS/PNI/NLP/COMPLIMENTARY MEDICINE/CLINICAL NUTRITION ALL AS A RESULT OF BEING V ILL WITH FM/CMPS/3AUTO IMMUNE DISEASES AS A RESULT OF BASELINE FM FOR 30 YEARS. NOW IN REMISSION FOR 10 YEARS AND TEACHING HOLISTICALLLY, WHAT MUST BE LEARNED AND APPLIED BY SUFFERERS.

  • sharon m August 7, 2007, 5:53 pm

    Would you please restate your comments for the ‘layperson’. What specific research by Travell and Simons has never been negated? What is now in remission? How are you consulting? What are you teaching holistically that can be learned and applied by sufferers? Couldn’t quite get past the jargon to the information you wanted to provide.

    Thank you,

  • sharon levin September 30, 2007, 4:06 am

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE REPLY TO THE QUESTONER- 1. TRAVELL AND SIMONS WORK REGARDING CMP AND TRIGGER POINTS IN FM (REF PhD RESEARCHER DEVIN STARLYNYL) SEE HER BOOKS ON THE SUBJECT-ARE UNQUESTIONABLE.
    2. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW ALL ANSWERS TO OTHER QUESTIONS WITHOUT THE ANGER THAT I HEAR BEHIND THE QUESTIONS, KINDLY E-MAIL ME ON fmssha@ibi.co.za AND I WILL HELP U WHEREVER I CAN AS MY EXPERIENCE, THANKS TO HAVING FM/CFIDS/ ETAL AND WORKING WITH PASSION TO REGAIN MY LIFE (REMISSSION), HAS ALLOWED ME TO STUDY, PRACTICE WHAT I TEACH, AND DO SO FOR ALL WHO FIND ME, DAILY. THANKS FOR THE QUESTIONS. I TOO ‘EMPHASISE YOUR POSSIBILITIES’.SL

  • Kerry Kaminski October 26, 2007, 9:26 am

    I believe the hypothesis to be very close, but the culprit is in the skin, not the muscles. The aberrent muscle behaviour is merely a result of disease in the deeper skin layers. Hopefully the researchers won’t give up when they discover again that there is nothing going on in the muscles.

  • Kerry Kaminski November 21, 2007, 10:24 am

    Sharon, I don’t dispute the assertion that the problem is familial. I have other sufferers in my immediate family, though I have the full blown FM. The problem with the muscle hypothesis is that the painful spots, if one has enough of them, are not restricted to muscles only. The common solution to that problem is to describe FM as a condition of the muscles, ligaments, and joints which only serves to highlight the weakness of describing the condition as such. Skin is everywhere. We mistakenly assume that when we press on a tender spot, that it is the muscle below that is sore instead of realizing it is the skin. Further, all so called manual therapies such as massage, accupuncture etc. act at least as much on the skin as they do on the muscles. The skin feels everything. Muscles do not.

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